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Material Flexing Couplings

Material flexing couplings typically do not require lubrication and operate in shear or compression and are able to accept angular, parallel and axial misalignment.

Material flexing couplings are
  • Jaw coupling, 
  • Sleeve coupling, 
  • Tire coupling, 
  • Disc coupling, 
  • Grid coupling and
  • Diaphragm coupling


Jaw Couplings

The jaw coupling also known as spider coupling is a material flexing coupling that transmits torque through compression of an elastomeric spider insert placed between two intermeshing jaws.

  • Flex element is commonly made of NBR, polyurethane, Hytrel or Bronze
  • Accommodates misalignment
  • Transmits torque
  • Used for torsional dampening (vibration)
  • Low torque, general purpose applications

Sleeve Coupling

The sleeve coupling transmits low to medium torque between connected equipment in shear through an elastomeric insert with male splines that mate with female hub splines. The insert material is typically EPDM, Neoprene or Hytrel and the insert can be a one or two-piece design.
  • Moderate misalignment
  • Torsional dampening (vibration)
  • End float with slight axial clearance
  • Low to medium torque, general purpose applications.


Tire Coupling


These couplings have a rubber or polyurethane element connected to two hubs. The rubber element transmits torque in shear.


  • Reduces transmission of shock loads or vibration.
  • High misalignment capacity
  • Easy assembly w/o moving hubs or connected equipment
  • Moderate to high-speed operation
  • Wide range of torque capacity

 Disc Coupling

The disc coupling’s principle of operation has the torque transmitted through flexing disc elements. It operates through tension and compression of chorded segments on a common bolt circle bolted alternately between the drive and driven side. These couplings are typically comprised of two hubs, two discs packs, and a centre member. A single disc pack can accommodate angular and limited axial misalignment. Two-disc packs are needed to accommodate parallel misalignment.
• Allows angular and parallel and axial misalignment
• Is a true limited end float design
• A zero backlash design
High speed rating and balance.

Diaphragm Coupling

Diaphragm couplings utilize a single or a series of plates or diaphragms for the flexible members. It transmits torque from the outside diameter of a flexible plate to the inside diameter, across the spool or spacer piece, and then from inside to outside diameter. The deflection of the outer diameter relative to the inner diameter is what occurs when the diaphragm is subject to misalignment. For example, axial displacement attempts stretch the diaphragm which results in a combination of elongations and bending of the diaphragm profile.
  • Allows angular, and parallel and high axial misalignments
  • Used in high torque, high-speed applications

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