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LIFE SAVING APPLIANCES (LSA)


Lifebuoy



􀂙 have an outer diameter of not more than 800 mm and an inner diameter of not less than 400 mm;

􀂙 be constructed of inherently buoyant material; it shall not depend upon rushes, cork shavings or granulated cork, any other loose granulated material or any air compartment which depends on inflation for buoyancy;

􀂙 be capable of supporting not less than 14.5 kg of iron in fresh water for a period of 24 hours;

􀂙 have a mass of not less than 2.5 kg;

􀂙 not sustain burning or continue melting after being totally enveloped in a fire for a period of 2 seconds;

􀂙 be constructed to withstand a drop into the water from the height at which it is stowed above the waterline in the lightest seagoing condition or 30 m, whichever is the greater, without impairing either its operating capability or that of its attached components;

􀂙 if it is intended to operate the quick release arrangement provided for the self-activated smoke signals and self-igniting lights,have a mass sufficient to operate the quick release arrangement;

􀂙 be fitted with a grabline not less than 9.5 mm in diameter and not less than 4 times the outside diameter of the body of the buoy in length. The grabline shall be secured at four equidistant points around the circumference of the buoy to form four equal loops.


Self-igniting lights


􀂙 be such that they cannot be extinguished by water;

􀂙 be of white colour and capable of either burning continuously with a luminous intensity of not less than 2 cd in all directions of the upper hemisphere or flashing (discharge flashing) at a rate of not less than 50 flashes and not more than 70 flashes per min with at least the corresponding effective luminous intensity;

􀂙 be provided with a source of energy capable of meeting the requirement of previous paragraph for a period of at least 2 hours;

􀂙 be capable of withstanding the drop test into the water from the height at which it is stowed above the waterline in the lightest seagoing condition or 30 m, whichever is the greater, without impairing either its operating capability or that of its attached components.

Self-activating smoke signals


􀂙 emit smoke of a highly visible color at a uniform rate for a period of at least 15 min when floating in calm water;

􀂙 not ignite explosively or emit any flame during the entire smoke emission time of the signal;

􀂙 not be swamped in a seaway;

􀂙 continue to emit smoke when fully submerged in water for a period of at least 10 s;

􀂙 be capable of withstanding the drop test into the water from the height at which it is stowed above the waterline in the lightest seagoing condition or 30 m, whichever is the greater, without impairing either its operating capability or that of its attached components.

Buoyant lifelines


􀂙 be non-kinking;

􀂙 have a diameter of not less than 8 mm; and

􀂙 have a breaking strength of not less than 5 kN.

Life-jacket


􀂙 shall not sustain burning or continue melting after being totally enveloped in a fire for a period of 2 seconds.

􀂙 at least 75% of persons, who are completely unfamiliar with the lifejacket, can correctly don it within a period of one min without assistance, guidance or prior demonstration;

􀂙 after demonstration, all persons can correctly don it within a period of one minute without assistance;

􀂙 it is clearly capable of being worn in only one way or, as far as is practicable, cannot be donned incorrectly;

􀂙 it is comfortable to wear;

􀂙 it allows the wearer to jump from a height of at least 4.5 m into the water without injury and without dislodging or damaging the lifejacket.

􀂙 shall have buoyancy which is not reduced by more than 5% after 24h submersion in fresh water.

􀂙 shall be fitted with a whistle firmly secured by a cord

Life-jacket light


􀂙 have a luminous intensity of not less than 0.75 cd in all directions of the upper hemisphere;

􀂙 have a source of energy capable of providing a luminous intensity of 0.75 cd for a period of at least 8 hours;

􀂙 be visible over as great a segment of the upper hemisphere as is practicable when attached to a lifejacket;

􀂙 be of white color.

􀂙 be provided with a manually operated switch; and

􀂙 flash at a rate of not less than 50 flashes and not more than 70 flashes per min with an effective luminous intensity of at least 0.75 cd.

Immersion Suits



The immersion suit shall be constructed with waterproof materials such that:

􀂙 it can be unpacked and donned without assistance within 2 min, taking into account any associated clothing and a lifejacket, if the immersion suit is to be worn in conjunction with a lifejacket;

􀂙 it will not sustain burning or continue melting after being totally enveloped in a fire for a period of 2 seconds;

􀂙 it will cover the whole body with the exception of the face. Hands shall also be covered unless permanently attached gloves are provided;

􀂙 it is provided with arrangements to minimize or reduce free air in the legs of the suit;

􀂙 following a jump from a height of not less than 4.5 m into the water there is no undue ingress of water into the suit.




An immersion suit which also complies with the requirements of life-jackets may be classified as a life-jacket.

An immersion suit which has buoyancy and is designed to be worn without a lifejacket shall be

fitted with a light and the whistle complying with the requirements for life-jackets.

If the immersion suit is to be worn in conjunction with a lifejacket, the lifejacket shall be worn over

the immersion suit. A person wearing such an immersion suit shall be able to don a lifejacket

without assistance.




In that case immersion suit shall permit the person wearing it:

􀂙 to climb up and down a vertical ladder at least 5 m in length;

􀂙 to perform normal duties associated with abandonment;

􀂙 to jump from a height of not less than 4.5 m into the water without damaging or dislodging the immersion suit, or being injured;

􀂙 to swim a short distance through the water and board a survival craft.


Anti-exposure suits


The anti-exposure suit shall be constructed with waterproof materials such that it:

􀂙 provides inherent buoyancy of at least 70 N;

􀂙 is made of material which reduces the risk of heat stress during rescue and evacuation operations

􀂙 covers the whole body with the exception of the head and hands and, where the Administration so permits, feet; gloves and a hood shall be provided in such a manner as to remain available for use with the anti-exposure suits;

􀂙 can be unpacked and donned without assistance within 2 min;

􀂙 does not sustain burning or continue melting after being totally enveloped in a fire for a period of 2 seconds;

􀂙 is equipped with a pocket for a portable VHF telephone;

􀂙 has a lateral field of vision of at least 120°.




An anti-exposure suit shall permit the person wearing it:

􀂙 to climb up and down a vertical ladder of at least 5 m in length;

􀂙 to jump from a height of not less than 4.5 m into the water with feet first, without damaging or dislodging the suit, or being injured;

􀂙 to swim through the water at least 25 m and board a survival craft;

􀂙 to don a lifejacket without assistance; and

􀂙 to perform all duties associated with abandonment, assist others and operate a rescue boat.

􀂙 if made of material which has no inherent insulation, be marked with instructions that it must be worn in conjunction with warm clothing

􀂙 be so constructed, that when worn as marked, the suit continues to provide sufficient thermal protection following one jump into the water which totally submerges the wearer and shall ensure that when it is worn in calm circulating water at a temperature of 5°C, the wearer's body core temperature does not fall at a rate of more than 1.5°C per hour, after the first 0.5 hours.

Thermal protective aids





A thermal protective aid shall be made of waterproof material having a thermal conductance of not more than 7800 W/m2.K and shall be so constructed that, when used to enclose a person, it shall reduce both the convective and evaporative heat loss from the wearer's body.




The thermal protective aid shall:

􀂙 cover the whole body of persons of all sizes wearing a lifejacket with the exception of the face. Hands shall also be covered unless permanently attached gloves are provided;

􀂙 be capable of being unpacked and easily donned without assistance in a survival craft or rescue boat

􀂙 permit the wearer to remove it in the water in not more than 2 min, if it impairs ability to swim.

􀂙 shall function properly throughout an air temperature range -30°C to +20°C.


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